The crucial mistakes of Dilma Rousseff in Brazil

By Eddy Montilla.

sao-paulo

Those who have watched the fireworks can understand better the turbulent career in politics that Dilma Rousseff has had in Brazil. A dazzling display of fireworks lits up the sky, people enjoy them and, minutes later, they cannot even remember their colors and shapes. Something similar happened to Brazil’s first woman president. If the almost incredible and efficient shinkansen cleaning system in Japan is subject of study in Harvard University, Rousseff’s case should be also studied because of its oddity. How could this lady go from a loved president to an impeached one, from a removed president from office to a forgotten president in her own land. Her two crucial mistakes can tell us the answer.

     First: Her inability to show, especially when dealing with problems that involved men, that she could be a person of strong character like anyone else In Brazil, corruption and bribery have always been acting like a pair of lovebirds. If during her presidential terms, problems related to these aspects had a huge impact, the reason must be found in her excessive gentleness towards some government employees, a mistake that was used by her political adversaries to take advantage of it. When she had to act like a hangman (in a figurative sense), she took an indulgent stance.

     Second: Not to be surrounded by people loyal to her. During difficult times for a president, loyal people will help him or her to stay standing. That was not Rousseff’s case since the more imminent her removal from office was, the more difficult to find people at her side was. In politics, of course, it is hard to foresee who is going to be loyal and who is going to be a traitor because the last one can be from your chef to your vice president.

     You do not cry over your mistakes, but learn from them. In Brazil, sooner or later, other women will hold the presidency of that South American nation. This is my recommendation for them: Be ready to become a hangman (in a figurative sense), if it is necessary, be careful of opportunists and traitors if you do not want to be forgotten or leave through the back door as Dilma Rousseff had to do.

This article was originally published in the digital newspaper World And Opinion with Eddy Montilla.

Copyright 2016 littlethings4all.wordpress.com. All rights are reserved.

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